Why and How We Create Software Requirements Specifications

Maria Boyarko

Maria Boyarko

Head of the BA Department at Andersen

Business Analysis
Sep 22, 2021
12 minutes to read
views
  1. Classic documentation: a Vision and Scope Document and a System Requirements Specification
  2. Time required to create classic documentation
  3. Custom documentation
  4. Conclusion

Imagine that you have started a project with an IT outsourcing company. How can you make sure that your software partner has understood your wishes correctly and will implement them exactly the way you want? The answer is: create a software requirements specification. In this article, we'll show you how this document can save your project and give you step-by-step instructions on how to create it.

When starting a project with an IT outsourcing company, a business owner is sometimes confused about why so much documentation is needed. From the outside, the work of a Business Analyst may look like a formality that delays the development phase. Nevertheless, each well-elaborated document saves the project from mistakes, delays, and financial losses. Below are the documents needed to ensure the success of a product.

Classic documentation: a Vision and Scope Document and a System Requirements Specification

The weaponry of a successful software development project should include the following documents: Vision and Scope Document, System Requirements Specification, Backlog, and User Story Mapping. All of them are created and agreed upon with the customer prior to the development stage.

A Vision and Scope Document — the product from a business perspective

Ideally, the work on a project begins with a document that answers the questions of what kind of program is being developed and why. Together with the customer, a Business Analyst forms the product image and describes what goals the business will achieve with the help of this software. In other words, a Vision and Scope Document - an artifact that is obtained as a result of the work of a Business Analyst with a customer (or customer representatives) at the stage of the discovery phase - is being created.

The Vision and Scope Document contains a set of business requirements (or business needs), high-level descriptions of system functionality, project priorities, a list of stakeholders, and other information. The Business Analyst develops the Vision and Scope Document so that all project participants have a high-level understanding of what the product is being built for.

Along with that, the Vision and Scope Document contains information about the “pains” of the business and its abilities to create a product. If we had described the problems of passengers in this document before the creation of Uber, for instance, we could have indicated that there was a lack of vehicles and people wanted to order cheaper cars faster. These are the problems that were solved with the corresponding application.

What is the benefit of a Vision an